The art of walking in cities

by cecile

Us humans, we walk. That’s how it is.

In cities, walking might be a trivial action, but is also an opportunity to deconstruct the way we move, rethink the relationship between our body and the space around us, reinventing our conception of public space. When we shift the barriers of our environment, this simple act of walking has the capacity to shake up our understanding of space, but also our interaction with cities and the people in them. Then the more we walk, the more the city transforms, and we walk happier.

In March 2018, the Wellesley College in Boston (one of the oldest universities on the american east coast – still for women only), invited us to give a series of workshops as part of their Concert Series. Professor Jenny Olivia Johnson hosted members of our creative team, Mouna (co-founder), Rebecca (product and environment design) and Eva (technical lead) in her class, Studies in 20th Century Music: Interactive Sound Art with Electronics.

Together with her 18 students they worked to co-design and build an interactive sound installation prototype. In this collaborative effort they envisioned what would happen when a trivial sidewalk moves, shakes, rings, sings, rises or rotates… An opportunity to continue experimenting with the art of walking, a theme we presented a few times in our projects, such as Mesa Musical Shadows.

On Saturday, March 17 at 4:00 pm, Mouna will give a talk about participative design at Wellesley College, followed by a public presentation of the students’ prototypes.

More infos about this event



More about the art of walking:

Jean Verville’s dancing golden avenue
Hamish Furton’s walking performance
Walking on water with Christo in Italy

The Ups & Downs of Making Giant Hammocks

by Pierre

This summer, we were proud to assist the town of Lac-Mégantic (QC) in the process of reinventing itself. The town sadly gained notoriety in 2013, when a freight train derailment of 72 crude oil tank cars caused a massive fire that destroyed the downtown area and took 47 lives.

We were invited to join the rebuilding efforts by creating a path to connect Lac-Mégantic with its new town centre.

The town, having lost most of its public places, was in need of a space for gathering. Lac-Mégantic is world-renowned for its starry skies (Mont-Mégantic is in fact the first International Dark Sky Reserve). With this in mind, we created a set of giant hammocks (30 x 7 ft.) at the end of our foot-path, for people to come together and look at the sky. The hammocks offer a friendly public space for people to watch the stars, the clouds, soak up the sun, or have a picnic.

As Melissa recently mentioned, Daily tous les jours work has many different aspects. I never thought I’d one day be a weave-your-own-giant-hammock expert, but as we learnt a couple of things along the way, we figured we might as well share them.

So if you’re planning on weaving an oversized hammock for your oversized garden, this article might be the right place to start.

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Prepping songs for the Giant Sing Along

by Michael

One of our ongoing projects is the representation of a large-scale outdoor karaoke, Giant Sing Along.

Just launched once more at the Minnesota State Fair, we held an online poll in preparation asking the public what songs they would like to sing. Based on suggestions, we produced a number of new videos to add to the existing repertoire. There’s a lot of love in every single video we prepare. The more love, the better the seamless sing-along.

In creating our own videos, for a couple of weeks each summer, everybody at the studio has these great tunes running on loop through their heads. Sometimes leading to incessant humming. Sometimes driving co-workers bananas. Sometimes sung at 1/2 speed.

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The Swings: Making-Of

by Antoine

On a Friday the 13th in June of 2014,  a truck left our Montreal warehouse in direction of Green Mountain Falls, Colorado. The grand premiere of the travelling edition of The Swings: An Exercise in Musical Cooperation will soon be underway. Four days and 18,000 pounds of steel later: here are images and a video of this adventure…

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